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political science
Posts tagged as: political science

Proposal To Create Open Primaries in Florida Moves Forward, But With Issues

| January 26, 2018

All candidates seeking the same office would run in a single primary regardless of party affiliation. The top two vote-getters would run in the general election.

Senate Leader Eyes Constitutional Amendment Requiring Two-Thirds Majority For Any Tax Increase

| December 12, 2017

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission, which meets every 20 years, has the power to place constitutional amendments on the November 2018 ballot.

How The Electoral College Mistrusts Voters

| November 23, 2016

That flaw is the Electoral College. For the fourth time in our history, and the second in 16 years, it has given the presidency to the candidate who polled fewer votes — 2 million fewer in this case — than his principal rival.

Early Voting: A Dissent

| October 15, 2016

Early voting gives political parties and special interests a chance to manipulate, to lock up blocs of votes in advance of Election Day and to keep opposition parties and candidates from offering another viewpoint, argues Nancy Smith.

Flagler County Royalty:
The Trouble With Uncontested Elections

| March 31, 2016

Property Appraiser Jay Gardner and Tax Collector Suzanne Johnston have no competition, Tom Bexley for clerk of court barely does: Good as they are at their jobs, it’s not good for Flagler or for the offices they represent.

Scalia’s Last Laugh: The Battle Begins

| February 14, 2016

With roughly 11 months remaining in his term, Obama undoubtedly will nominate a replacement for Antonin Scalia. Anyone he names will surely be more liberal than Scalia, and anyone he names will tip the balance of the court.

Low Gas Prices Are Great For You and Me. For World Security? Not So Much.

| February 3, 2016

Banditry, corruption and tyranny from Saudi Arabia to Iraq to Russia depends on high oil prices. As prices fall, the bandits in charge will quarrel more among themselves – and with their neighbors.

For Millennials, Government Is a Gap of Generations and Representation

| December 27, 2015

Millennials, those born after 1980 who entered adulthood at the turn of the century, hold just 5 percent of state legislative seats, while comprising 31 percent of the U.S. voting-age population.

The Politics of Resentment: Why Poorer Areas Are Increasingly Voting Republican

| November 23, 2015

A political puzzle: Parts of the country that depend on the safety-net programs supported by Democrats are increasingly voting for Republicans who favor shredding that net. The reason: the poor don’t vote.

Charter Review Proposal Finally Dies Amid Accusations of “Political Ploy” and Straw Men

| October 20, 2015

Palm Coast Council member’s proposal for a charter review got no support as fellow-council member Jason DeLorenzo called the move a “political ploy” and Council member Heidi Shipley’s attempt to have the council itself lead a review also failed.

Clowns on the Campaign Trail and the
Revolt Against Professional Politicians

| August 4, 2015

Donald Trump is part of a wider phenomenon of disaffected voters turning away from mainstream political parties and following populists and political entertainers, or clowns if you like, argues Ian Buruma.

When Liberal Democracy Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be

| May 14, 2015

The puzzle is not why democracy so often turns out to be illiberal. It is that liberal democracy can ever emerge.

Steven Nobile Thrust For Broad Charter Review Has Rest of Palm Coast Council on Defensive

| May 12, 2015

A push for a charter review by Palm Coast City Council member Steven Nobile provoked an at-times heated discussion at council today as members largely opposed the notion absent a more defined public drive for changing the city’s equivalent of a constitution.

Why Voters Don’t Give a Damn Anymore: Government Of the Few, By the Few, For the Fewest

| December 2, 2014

Barely a third of the eligible voting-age population — 36.4 percent — voted in the midterms this month. The major reason people don’t vote is that they don’t think it will make a difference, argues Martin Dyckman.

If You Think Businessmen Have Any Business Running Government, Think Again

| July 25, 2014

Government is about essential services; business is about profit.  Essential services must be improved, not cut. Government is designed to protect the common good, and has never and will never be successfully run as a business, argues Marc Yacht.

Florida’s Political Scientist:
Five Questions for Susan McManus

| July 2, 2013

Susan MacManus is probably Florida’s most-quoted political scientist. A distinguished professor at the University of South Florida’s Department of Government and International Affairs, she’s also a featured columnist on the Sayfie Review website and a political analyst for Tampa’s WFLA Channel 8.

Other People’s Money: How Flagler County Is Closing on a Raw Deal at Taxpayers’ Expense

| May 3, 2013

The proposed $1.23 million county acquisition of the old Memorial Hospital property in Bunnell reveals, especially in its fine print, its secrecy until now and gun-to-the-head May 6 deadline for commissioners to sign off on it, hurried deal-making that profits the sellers while exposing taxpayers to huge uncertainty and costs.

Republican Presumptions Aside, Florida Is Not a One-Party State Yet

| October 28, 2012

Florida is dominated by Republicans, but to argue against the election of a Democrat to the Florida House–as the GOP’s Travis Hutson is arguing in his bid against Milissa Holland–is a reflection of the arrogance of a majority party that considers minorities, if not democracy, irrelevant, and that assumes that once a majority, always a majority.

Mitt Romney’s , and Republicans’, Goldwater Moment

| September 27, 2012

Blowing an election it should have won, the GOP might finally realize it has strayed far out of the mainstream and become a little too odd for the American public, writes Bill Cotterell.

Partisanship Works. One-Party States Don’t.

| September 23, 2012

They are two of the most repeated claims you’ll hear every four years: That this is the most important election in our lifetime. And that partisanship is demolishing the country. Rubbish on both counts.

Florida’s Gang of 10: How You Got Robbed of Representation by Lawmakers’ Rubber Stamp

| September 20, 2012

Just 10 of Florida’s 160 legislators voted recently on a $58-million budget amendment that carries large policy implications for citizens across the state. Few citizens were representedby this or any other decisions passed by the Legislative Budget Commission.

Term Limits for County Commissioners? Florida Supreme Court Will Decide

| April 10, 2012

The cases, brought by voters in Broward and Sarasota counties, presented the court with the question of how much power charter counties have to impose qualifications and disqualifications on candidates for county commission.

Backyard Beirut: Florida’s NRA-Loaded Gun Rules Drill Bullets In Local Ordinances

| November 4, 2011

Guns in child care centers. Guns in county parks. Guns at city hall. All allowed now in Florida. So is your neighbor’s right to shoot off guns in the backyard, even if bullets stray over to yours as Florida’s NRA-inspired gun laws pre-empt local reason.

Why Attending Local Government Meetings Has Nothing To Do With Being Involved

| July 22, 2011

No one was in the audience when school administrators making $97,000 a year made their pitch for raises. Don’t blame the public for not being there. It’s not the public’s fault, and there are far better ways to be involved.

Executive Overreach? Supreme Court
Considers Rick Scott’s Rule-Making Powers

| June 29, 2011

In oral arguments today, justices seemed unconvinced by the case of a blind woman on food stamps. The case speaks to Scott’s rule-making power–and where the Legislature’s power ends.

Birthers, Royals and Crocks

| April 29, 2011

Between Barack Obama’s birth certificate and William Windsor’s wedding to his girlfriend Kate, lust for make-believe idiocies at the expense of reality explains why problem-solving isn’t much of a priority these days.

Reality Check: Rick Scott vs. Florida

| February 18, 2011

It’s become one of Governor Rick Scott’s favorite clichés: “Government has no resources of its own. Government can only give to us what is previously taken from us.” He’s in the wrong country.

Election Primer: Amendments 5 and 6 Pit Power Against Voters in Redistricting

| October 13, 2010

Florida’s proposed Amendments 5 and 6 would diminish the power of incumbents and legislative majorities to pick their own voters when they draw up voting districts every 10 years.

Why Republicans Are Listed First All Over Flagler’s Nov. 2 Ballot (It’s Not a Conspiracy)

| October 12, 2010

Being listed first does matter in local races, especially in non-partisan ones, as lazy or uninformed voters tend to go for the first choice they’re presented.

When Not Voting Is The Loudest Vote

| August 24, 2010

Voting is neither a virtue nor a responsibility. It is a neutral civil right. Not voting is a right of equal weight, a choice as defensible as the choice to vote. Both are exercises in freedom.

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